Monthly Archives: March 2013

Makers; a Story of Startistry

Makers; a Story of Startistry

In the ’60s, age 32 was mandatory retirement age for airline stewardesses. And the pay was a joke. Random girdle checks were only the beginning of the degrading work conditions.

stARTists to the rescue! Watch this documentary if you missed any of the women’s movement. Makers; A Story of StARTistry

Spoiler alert: Startist Sara Blakely created Spanx and is now a billionaire. #somuchbetter

 

 

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It’s not what you finish, it’s what you stART.

It’s not what you finish, it’s what you stART.

My two teenagers tell me I come from “opposite land” – that I tell them the opposite of what a mom should tell a daughter. Like today when I told my 17-year-old her dress was not short enough. Or yesterday when I told my college student not to worry about finishing her term paper. I told her just to write one page and go to bed. She texted me at 2 a.m. to say that her first draft was done.

Finishing is important – like paying bills on time and being nice to old people. Certainly, we should teach our children that finishing is a good thing to do. But stARTists know that if we teach our children how to stART, the finishing will often enough take care of itself.

Everything we need to finish exists in the moment we start: The desire, the decision, the passion, the priority, the reckless resolve . . . it all comes together to ignite a momentum that wants to finish what it starts.

While we don’t always know what the finish looks like, one thing is for sure: it always begins with a stART.

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stARTists are delusional.

stARTists are delusional.

There is no getting around it, in bad lighting, creativity looks a bit like mental illness.

Given that, perhaps the craziest looking, most courageous stARTists are entrepreneurs. They do their stARTing where the stakes are highest, right out in front of everyone.

I am proud to have started a company or three in my time, and I can attest that starting a company requires unparalleled feats of psychosis. When a painting is bad, you paint over it; when a new business seems all wrong, you call in whatever self-deception, grandiosity and hallucinations required to get you to another day.

I’m a fan of a well-lit blog that pays homage to the stART-up artist. Enjoy this slide show by stARTist extraordinaire, Hugh MacLeod, author of Ignore Everyone.

 

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