Monthly Archives: August 2013

50 years ago, a change stARTed

50 years ago, a change stARTed

I am moved by this 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. It is one of the first things I remember as a child, and one of the first things I saw on a television at school. My teacher, Mrs. Ericson, let us skip reading group to watch it. Today, looking at the video of the march I was struck by the diverse people involved – people who stopped their lives for a moment, to stART a change.

It seems to me that when a condition exists that clearly demands change, it requires the courage of many to stART things moving in a new direction. Sure, individual heroes can clear the path, but change that impacts many requires the work of many.

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stARTing to get it

stARTing to get it

“. . .the arts industry can feel very foreign to the business community. But as companies seek new ways to build their competitive advantage, they are increasingly finding that the arts are the key to driving true innovation, ultimately reaching their business goals.” In this week’s column for the Huffington Post, Robert Lynch, President & CEO of Americans for the Arts, lists the five key CEO challenges and how the arts respond to them. The Private Sector’s Secret Weapon.

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It stARTs with focus.

It stARTs with focus.

Yesterday’s luncheon celebrating Kansas City’s “Women Who Mean Business” reminded me of the time in my life – and in the women’s equality movement – when I thought it was weak and counterproductive to focus on women. I thought it alienated men, with whom I was doing business and collaborating. I thought it was unseemly.

I’m over it.

Right now in history, advancing women is critical to building the kind of world we want our children to inherit. And it stARTs with focusing on their unique contributions.

Stay close, guys. We want you in the picture!

Men will still be in the picture if we focus on women.

Men will still be in the picture if we focus on women.

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stARTing a selfie

stARTing a selfie

One of the first wrinkles in my self promotion adventure was staring at me in the mirror this morning. Maybe a second or third wrinkle, too. (Given my aging eyesight, I can’t be sure.) Either way, the 50-something face staring back at me may not be the best face forward for promoting a book that I want young women to find hip.

I feel hip. I feel sharp and young and in the game. I feel like I can hang in social media circles with the vulgar college girls and the snarky new moms. I can write in an ageless voice. I think I just need to quit looking in the mirror before I put on makeup.

Sadly, how we create is often defined by how we see ourselves. Science shows that the mere suggestion to a person that they are old or sick or tired will instantly stunt their problem solving and work product.

So I’m working on a profile picture overhaul. And it’s the most fun I’ve had all week!

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I’ve sketched me, clipped vintage photos I wish looked like me, and painted some really bad self portraits. So far, everything represents me better than the head shot on my LinkedIn profile.

The best part about playing creatively with my profile is that I can try on looks that might not work for my entire patchwork life. For instance, since I have some conservative business responsibilities, like serving on the board of an insurance company, I can’t really dye my hair blue. But in one self portrait, I’m a blue-haired lady.

That’s hip now, right?

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